Chronograph

A watch equipped with a chronograph can

measure time intervals, for example a sporting

performance.

It is a watch with two independent time systems: one tells the time and the other records short times. The second, minute, and even hour counters are started and stopped by pressing one or two push pieces, depending on the model. This permits immediate and precise timing of an event.

True to its tradition of innovation, Blancpain brought out its calibre 1185, the world’s thinnest self-winding chronograph, in 1987. This movement respects watchmaking tradition by incorporating the column wheel in order to guarantee a smooth and precise reaction of the push pieces when they are activated, but also introduced innovative aspects which resolved difficulties traditionally linked to chronographs. Thus the vertical clutch developed by Blancpain eliminates unwanted jumps of the hands when starting the chronograph, and furthermore protects it from shocks. In addition, this novel solution allows the chronograph mechanism to continue functioning without the worry of a possible adverse effect on the accurate running of the watch.     

Blancpain has forged its reputation as world leader in the field of chronographs by developing additional complications, such as the split-time or flyback chronograph and by designing combinations of complications that include a chronograph, such as the perpetual calendar chronograph or the tourbillon chronograph.

The name “chronograph” comes from the Greek and means a device which writes the time. This name came about because the first chronographs worked by depositing a droplet of ink on the dial. A “chronometer” fulfils the same function as the chronograph, although the term refers to an instrument which need not necessarily be a watch, but which meets particular criteria and is certified accordingly.

Key models Chronograph

6685-1127-55B6685-3642-55B